Teacher Workforce Analysis
Teacher workforce analysis report

In 2015-16, MATSITI in partnership with Ernst and Young (EYC3) prepared the Analysis of the 2015 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Teaching Workforce.

This analysis made comparisons on a range of measures between the 2015 and 2012 available data for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander teachers employed in government and non-government schools in all Australian states and territories. A summary Workforce Snapshot report and Workforce Infographic are also available.

Efforts in ascertaining an accurate picture of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s participation as teachers and student teachers were hampered by limited visibility of workforce data on the part of some government, Catholic and independent school jurisdictions and universities across Australia. In that context, the EYC3 analysis provides some valuable trend data and findings.

The 2012 and 2015 data mapped the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander teacher workforce in terms of their school settings, types of locations, age, gender, promotional level and employment type.


Workforce snapshot
Teacher workforce snapshot report

Key findings on the numbers of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander teachers include:

  • 3100 teachers identified as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander in 2015, representing 1% of the total teacher workforce in Australia. (with 5.3% of school students identifying as Indigenous)
  • 2661 teachers identified as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander in 2012
  • Between 2012 and 2015 there was a net increase in teachers identifying as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander of 439
  • Between 2012 and 2015, 697 new Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander teachers were recruited in schools
  • 1001 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander teachers who were employed in 2012 were not captured in 2015 data and for the purposes of the analysis were regarded as having left teaching.

These findings reveal that the apparent growth in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander teachers is low and their representation is far lower than that of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander school students.

Also, MATSITI research has revealed that most employment growth was achieved by a small number of school jurisdictions, rather than being evenly distributed across Australian employers.

Teacher distribution in Australian States and Territories [from MATSITI Infographic]

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