Corey
Corey, Science/PE Teacher with Students

The following report provides  comprehensive data analysis and workforce profile of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander teachers employed in Australian schools in 2012.

The report is an unprecedented benchmark study to inform future workforce planning, and to implement effective and lasting employment strategies – for schools, Australian governments, education workforce planners, university schools of education, professional associations, career advisers and our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Teacher Workforce Analysis » PDF, 4mB

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Summary of findings for Indigenous teacher workforce, 2012 snapshot

  • The estimate of the total numbers of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander teachers in all sectors was 3,700
  • The median age of Aboriginal and Torres Islander teachers was two years less than for all teachers (43 compared to 45 years of age).
  • Within the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander teachers cohort 77% were female, compared to the national average of 72%.
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander teachers were more likely to be teaching in low SES schools than other teachers.
  • The proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander principals to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander teachers was very similar to the total school workforce (78, 3.8% versus 3.9%)
  • Most of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander teachers worked in major cities, with a higher proportion found in very remote locations.
  • The median number of years with current employer for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander teachers is 11 years, compared to 13 years for the total teacher workforce.
  • The proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander teachers working in primary schools is similar to the total teaching workforce (55% and 54%)
  • More Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander teachers reported completion of a Bachelor degree (60%) than the total teaching working (54%).
  • Over the last 5 years, 50-60% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander education graduates have been employed in teaching positions in schools.
  • Collection of data on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status is inconsistent across jurisdictional employers and regulators.

 

We contend that the learning needs of a culturally diverse student population will be better served by a more diverse teaching workforce.

I commend this report as an unprecedented benchmark study to inform future workforce planning, and to implement effective and lasting employment strategies – for schools, Australian governments, education workforce planners, university schools of education, professional associations, career advisers and our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Professor Peter Buckskin, Director, MATSITI

doe-teacher-workforce-reports

A major series of National teacher workforce and teacher education reports were released by the  Department of Education released on 19 October, including:

  • National Teacher Workforce Dataset (NTWD)
  • Staff in Australa’s Schools (SiAS)
  • OECD Teaching and Learning International Survey
  • Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study

7 thoughts on “Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander teacher workforce analysis

  1. Pingback: Follow my lead – making teaching a career of choice « More Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Teachers Initiative

  2. The next step from this research might be to look at how the Aboriginal teachers are supported and treated within the workplace.
    How many Aboriginal teachers are still experiencing racism?
    Ignorance of Aboriginal culture
    People’s perception that Aboriginal people get ‘everything for nothing’.
    Will we ever ‘close the gap’ while the above perceptions/behaviours are continuing?

  3. As a teacher and principal I have experienced racism and witnessed racism towards students. This is a systemic problem and seems to be worse in remote and regional communities where Indigenous populations are 40%-60% of school community with a disparity between very low socio-economic families and wealthy pastoralists. The only way to fix this problem systemic support for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander teachers and principals, and a targeted mandated series of cross cultural competency training for school staff. QLD has the EATSIPS framework but this has been reduced to a ‘curriculum’ area which was never its intention. It’s time for good quality research and trials in combatting racism in schools starting with central and regional offices to assist and support all staff in their learning journeys and ability to understand institutionalized attitudes and perceptions of our mob. Our people also need to be trained and empowered around this as we can do a lot of extra damage or reenforcement of stereotypes if we too are not skilled in responding to institutionalized racism and ethnocentric view points. Adversely without systemic support, we as Indigenous educators can be left feeling disillusioned with the system and fall into mental illness such as anxiety, depression or post traumatic stress. Or adversely leave the education system all together. It is certainly time for a big change to move forward as a nation.

  4. One of the shocking findings above stated:
    Over the last 5 years, 50-60% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander education graduates have been employed in teaching positions in schools.

    I was really worried by this. That means about half of the graduates arn’t employed as teachers once they finished their tough and expensive 4 year degree. Why is this??? My daughter has thought about becomng a teacher but she has done training in other areas and then can’t get a job afterwards. Being Aboriginal is an extra challenge to employment. Why are so few actually employed as teachers?
    Do they all get offered jobs and then leave? Or do only half get offered jobs when they graduate? Why is this happening?

  5. The aims of the More Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Initiative (MATSITI) are not only to encourage more Indigenous students to consider teaching as a career, but also to increase the number of Indigenous students entering and remaining in teaching positions in Australian schools.
    A range of projects are funded by MATSITI that cover leadership development, mentoring (for education students and early career teachers), career counselling support in schools and alternative pathways into teaching. Please see http://matsiti.edu.au/2014-15-partnerships/ for more information on the 56 projects funded by MATSITI to date.
    We are confident these projects will see an increase in the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander education graduates being employed in teaching positions in schools, over the next 5 years.

  6. Pingback: MATSITI continues to seek evidence for workforce reforms « More Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Teachers Initiative

  7. Pingback: MATSITI @NATSIEC 2015 « More Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Teachers Initiative

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